An analysis of references from jane austens emma in clueless by amy heckerling

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An analysis of references from jane austens emma in clueless by amy heckerling

This is a paper written by an undergraduate English student. Both of the main characters, Cher and Emma, are spoiled, high class snobs who, after undergoing a crisis brought on by their own pride and repression of their feelings, are transformed from callowness to mental and emotional maturity.

However, the film also diverges from the original story in that it eliminates a key character and events that have an effect on Emma Woodhouse's psychological growth. From the very beginning of both the novel and the movie, we can see the similarities between the two main characters.

Emma Woodhouse is part of the rich, upscale society of a "large and populous village" in nineteenth century England, while Cher Horowitz lives in rich, upscale Beverly Hills, U.

In Highbury, the Woodhouses are "first in consequence there. All looked up to them. Cher is also one of the most popular girls at her school.

The description of Emma that Austen gives is also a description of Cher. She is "handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition.

Because of their wealth, both Emma and Cher are spoiled, in control socially, and tend to think too highly of themselves.

This is a result of the lack of a maternal figure in their lives, as well as their fathers' over-indulgence. Cher has everything a teenage girl could want: Like a lot of girls, she spends a large amount of time and money at the mall; however, she spends hundreds and thousands of dollars on her clothes, not the kind of money a typical teenager would spend.

Because her father is so busy with his court cases, he has little time to spend with her to give her guidance and discipline. An example of Cher's snobbishness can be seen in the scene where she and Dionne are explaining to Tai how to become more popular.

Cher states that she has already started to elevate her social status "due to fact that you hang with Dionne and I. A similar state of affairs exists in Emma. Emma's mother had also died when she was very young, and her father and governess were too lenient and indulgent during her upbringing.

This snobbery leads Cher and Emma to, in their eyes, take pity on Tai and Harriet Smith, two girls of lower social status. Emma decides that Harriet's "soft blue eyes should not be wasted on the inferior society of Highbury and its connections", and that the friends Harriet has already made were "unworthy of her" and "causing her harm".

Even though she has never met the Martin family, with whom Harriet had stayed, she condemns them as "coarse and unpolished, and very unfit to be the intimates of a girl who wanted only a little more knowledge to be quite perfect. So, Emma embarks on a mission to advance Harriet to a more desirable state.

She "would take notice of her; she would improve her; she would detach her from her bad acquaintance, and introduce her to good society; she would form her opinions and her manners.

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In CluelessCher sets out to improve Tai, the new girl at school and the counterpart to Harriet in the novel. Tai is obviously of a lower class than Cher; her clothes lack style, her hair is stringy and dyed a hideous red colour, she has a thick Bronx accent and she likes to smoke drugs.

Cher decides to give her a complete make-over: She forces Tai to exercise in order to improve her physique, and wants her to read "one non-school book a week" to improve her mind.

When Josh states his disbelief, Cher proudly replies, "What, that I'm devoting myself so generously to someone else? Her life will be better because of me.

As part of their assimilation to higher status, there are rules to be followed when it comes to dating and marriage; they are not allowed to see certain males, and should only date the men Cher and Emma find appropriate.

An analysis of references from jane austens emma in clueless by amy heckerling

Tai and Harriet are so captivated by their mentors that they do not dissent, even though they are being coerced into ignoring their own hearts. On her first day at her new school, Tai meets and instantly likes Travis in the cafeteria.

However, Travis is from the long-haired, drug-smoking, lower-class skateboarder group, which Cher says, "No respectable girl actually dates. She automatically assumes that if Tai were to date Travis, Tai's social status at school would plummet.

At the expense of Tai dating the boy she prefers, Cher makes it her mission to find a proper boyfriend for Tai. Tai is shown the various social groups of the student body, of which a small group of boys "are the only acceptable ones. Cher sets into motion a plan to bring him and Tai together; she lies to Tai when she tells her that Elton is interested in her.

When Cher takes a picture of Tai, Elton asks for a copy. Cher and Tai automatically assume this is proof of Elton's interest in Tai, especially after he hangs it in his locker. Later, however, it is revealed that the only reason he wanted the picture was that Cher took it, not because it is a picture of Tai.

Their assumption that Elton likes Tai is understandable; it is only natural to assume that the subject of the photograph would be the object of his desire. The situation comes to a head during the party in the Valley. Cher originally balked at going to the party because it "took an hour to get there and they're usually broken up after the first hour" She changes her mind, however, when she learns that Elton will be there.Character Transformation in and Jordie Margison # English E Prof.

Orange Dec. 3, The film Clueless, written and directed by Amy Heckerling, is an adaptation of Jane Austen's novel Emma and closely parallels the story in terms of characterization and action. Both of the main characters, Cher and Emma, are spoiled, high class snobs who, after undergoing a crisis brought on by.

initiativeblog.com is a platform for academics to share research papers. - A Comparison of Emma by Jane Austen and Movie Clueless The film Clueless, written and directed by Amy Heckerling, is an adaptation of Jane Austen's novel Emma and closely parallels the story in terms of character development and action.

Jane Austen’s Emma Gets a 90’s Makeover Jer Fairall Released in the summer of to surprise commercial and critical success, Amy Heckerling’s Clueless anticipated and possibly even stimulated several notable trends that were to become widely visible in the years, and even decades, that followed.

The Genius of Jane Austen: Her Love of Theatre and Why She Works in Hollywood Kindle Edition particularly in explaining why Amy Heckerling’s ‘Clueless’ succeeds much better than Douglas McGrath’s ‘Emma” (because the former finds a way of treating Emma ironically which is much more in keeping with Austen’s intention of Reviews: 3.

The Jane Austen Society of North America is dedicated to the enjoyment and appreciation of Jane Austen and her writing. JASNA is a nonprofit organization, staffed by volunteers, whose mission is to foster among the widest number of readers the study, appreciation, and understanding of Jane Austen’s works, her life, and her genius.

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